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TS-1: FOUNDATION COURSE IN TOURISM

Course Code: TS-1                                                            Programme: BHM                                                            
Total Marks: 100                                       Assignment Code: TS-1/TMA/2012-13

Note: This TMA consists of two parts.
Part I consists of two questions out of which you have to attempt any one. The question carries 25 marks and should be answered in about 700 words.
Part II consists of 8 questions. Attempt any five in about 500 words. Each question carries 15 marks. Send your TMA to the Coordinator of your Study Centre.


PART-I
1. What are the threats and obstacles to tourism in India?                                              25
                                                                  OR
2. What is the link between image and attraction in relation to a tourist destination? Give examples.
                                                                                                                                 …

how embarrassing! whoops

Whoops! How embarrassing. Now, everyone is going to remember him ONLY as the President who unknowingly insulted the Queen. Yep, that'll be his legacy. Nothing else…
Last night, Barack Obama was the Queen's specially invited guest at a banquet at Buckingham Palace. Honored by the invitation, President Obama attempted to give a speech thanking her Majesty for her friendship and grace. He asked the congregation to stand as he proposed a toast. And then he said, “To Her Majesty the Queen.”
Thinking that was their cue, the orchestra of the Scots Guard mistakenly started to play God Save The Queen. Everyone fell silent, as is tradition,…except President Obama. Apparently, he was unaware that it is against protocol to talk over the national anthem, especially when you are in front of the Queen.
But he forged on with his speech anyway, unaware of the stares he was getting from across the room and the tiniest, but the most uncomfortable smile coming across her Majesty'…

coffee variations and laced coffee

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Espresso
Espresso has no milk, just pure coffee. Most traditional coffee recipes revolve around a single or double espresso shots. If you are a coffee connoisseur then you should try and learn how to make one.  It is generally made from a single 1 oz shot of coffee made with 7 Gms of finely ground coffee extracted at between 18 and 25 seconds. There are many recopies and this is small selection to choose from –
Americano (American) – This is espresso shot that is diluted to taste with hot water. The name was given to insult Americans who the Europeans believed were not up to drinking full espressos.
Black coffee: Coffee served with no milk.

Cappuccino
Cappuccino usually consists of equal parts espresso, steamed milk, and frothed milk. All this makes the coffee taste more diluted and weaker. Some coffee shops will sprinkle cinnamon or flaked chocolate on top and other will add more milk than others. All shops make some variance to suit the taste of regular customers.

Dry Cappuccino
This i…

french for restaurant

Sommelier- wine waiter

Artichaut- artichoke

Assiette- plate

Assiette a potage- soup plate

Aubergine- eggplant

Abats- organs like kidney, heart

Aboyer- the person who announces kitchen order

Aliment- food

Anchois- anchovy

Bain marie- hot water well or bath for keeping food at constant temperature.

Beurre- butter

Blancher- to blanch

Ble- wheat

Bouillon- stock

Bouteille- bottle

Carte des vins- wine list

Caviar- roe (egg) of sturgeon fish

Cendrier- ashtray

Champignon- mushroom

Citron- lemon

Corbeille a pain- bread basket

Couteau- knife

Courvert- a cover

Crabe- a shell fish ‘Crab’

Crème- cream

Cuillere- spoon

Croutons- cubes of fried bread

Cuisine- kitchen

Dejeuner- lunch

Diner- dinner

Eau- water

Echalote- shallots

Entrecote- sirloin (beef)

Escargot- snails

Farine- flour

Foie- liver

Fourchette- fork

Fromage- cheese

Hier- yesterday

Huitre- oyster

Jour- day

Jus- juice

Lait- milk

Legumes- vegetables

Louche- ladle

Maitre d hotel- head waiter

Mouton- mutton

Nappe- table cloth

Nom- name

Oeuf- e…

TOPICS TO BE WRITTEN IN JOURNAL FOR FIRST SEMESTER CHITKARA UNIVERSITY AND GBC

Rules: 
•Each topic should be clearly headlined.
•Important words or phrases should be written in bold letters.
•Justifying Pictures should be pasted related to each topic.
•Wherever charts are required, they should be scaled and made on separated pages.
Chapter 1THE HOTEL & CATERING INDUSTRY
A.Introduction to the Hotel Industry
B.Global hospitality industry
C.Indian hospitality industry
D. Role of Catering establishment in the travel/tourism industry
E.Types of F&B operations
F.Classification of Commercial, Residential/Non-residential
G.Welfare Catering - Industrial/Institutional/Transport such as air, road, rail, sea, etc.
H.Organization of food and beverage catering industry (Structure of the catering industry)- a brief description of each

Note: add pictures related to each topics

Chapter 2DEPARTMENTAL ORGANISATION & STAFFING
A. Organisation of F&B department of hotel
B. Principal staff of various types of F&B operations
C. French terms related to F&B staff
D…

TOPICS TO BE WRITTEN IN JOURNAL FOR FIRST SEMESTER B.SC. IN HOSPITALITY AND HOTEL ADMINISTRATION

Rules:  •Each topic should be clearly headlined.
•Important words or phrases should be written in bold letters.
•Justifying Pictures should be pasted related to each topic.
•Wherever charts are required, they should be scaled and made on separated pages.
Chapter 1THE HOTEL & CATERING INDUSTRY
A.Introduction to the Hotel Industry
B.Global hospitality industry
C.Indian hospitality industry
D. Role of Catering establishment in the travel/tourism industry
E.Types of F&B operations
F.Classification of Commercial, Residential/Non-residential
G.Welfare Catering - Industrial/Institutional/Transport such as air, road, rail, sea, etc.
H.Organization of food and beverage catering industry (Structure of the catering industry)- a brief description of each
Note: add pictures related to each topics

Chapter 2DEPARTMENTAL ORGANISATION & STAFFING
A. Organisation of F&B department of hotel
B. Principal staff of various types of F&B operations
C. French terms related to F&B staff
D…

coffee-how its made

Sideboards

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The other names used for a sideboard are  work station or service console or service station or dummy waiter

 The style and design of  a sideboard varies from establishment to establishment and is dependent upon:
the style of service and the food and beverage on offerthe number of service staff working from on sideboardthe number of tables to be served from on sideboardthe amount of equipment it is expected to hold. It is essential that the sideboard is of minimum size and portable so that it may be esasily moved if necessary.


If the sideboard is too large for its purpose it is then taking up spacee which could be used to seat more customers.

The top should be of a heat resistant material which can be easily washed down.

If a hotplate is to be used then it should be inserted in the top so it is level with the working top.

After service the sideboard is either completely emptied out or restocked for the next service.

The material used in the makeup of the sideboard should blend with th…

corkscrew

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Early wine was stored first in terracotta amphoras and later in wooden barrels. Wine was never aged; it was briefly stored or transported and served before it had a chance to spoil. Wine glasses and decanters first appeared in Venice around the 12th century, used only for serving the wine.
Glass-blowing technology improved and in the early 18th century glass wine bottles with small bottlenecks made airtight wine storage possible. Wine could now be safely aged.
The English were the first to seal wine bottles, using cork imported from Spain or Portugal. Cork comes from the wood of the Quercus Suber or cork tree, a species of Oak native to Spain. Obviously, corkscrews were invented as an easy way of removing the cork from a bottle.
However, wine bottles were not the first bottles to be corked. Bottle tops and cans did not become common until after W.W.II. Before that time and before wine was ever corked, all kinds of substances were often stored in corked containers: beer, medicine, cos…

Preparing and serving expresso coffee-SOPs

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Preparing and serving cocktails-SOPs

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Lounge and light meal service sequence-SOPs

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Handling of food order delay-SOPs

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Difference between coffee shop and specialty restaurant

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dealing with intoxicated guest-SOPs

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Daily briefing-SOPs

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Bar sequence of service-SOPs

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Indian wines

Just about 60 years back there was nothing worthy about Indian grapes, what to talk about Indian wines. A lot of raisins and grapes were imported from Afghanistan in India. There was a notion that grapes can only grow in extreme cold climates has now been proved wrong. There is a riot of variety and succulent sweet grapes available in abundance in India. The wine making is still in its infancy. Indian wines have a great future because most of the grapes are of seedless variety. Surprisingly they have high sugar content.

Indian white wines of medium dry variety are quite interesting and can be compared with International standards of standard quality wines, but red wines are yet to prove their worthiness.
Most of wine producing areas are near foothills of Vindhyachal or Deccan plateau like Andhra radesh, Karnataka, Maharashtra and Goa.
Indian Wine Regions
a.    Champhai
The Champhai wine region is located in Mizoram, the most southerly of the Seven Sister States of eastern India.  The state…

wines of newzealand, chile, south africa, algeria, china

New Zealand comprises two islands — North Island and South Island. The North Island is on the same latitude as Tasmania, The most quality producers are based in North Island as wine industry was founded there. Most producers are based around Auckland area. The North Island climate is warmer and wetter than South Island. The North Island producers buy their grapes from important vineyard areas of Hawkes Bay and Gisborne, Bay of Plenty and Kumeu.
The South Island has cooler climate with lower rainfall. The South Island is also home to many producers too famous one being Cooks (owned by Corbans), one ofNewZealand first wine exporters. In South Island Vineyards are sited in Marlborough, Nelson, Canterbury and Central Otago.
Vines were first introduced and planted in the year 1819 at Kerikeri in the Bay of Islands but it is not certain whether or not wine was made from them. Australia's wine Industry founder James Busby planted vineyard in 1832 from which wine was produced.
Until recently…

Australia wines

Australia in terms of wine making is pretty young and new in the field. Captain Arthur Philip, first Governor of New South Wales, in 1788 planted the first vines. He took help of French prisoners of war whom he brought from England. They had fair amount of knowledge of wine making. Australia viticulture owes most to James Busby, a teacher in an orphanage. He collected 20,000 cuttings of 678 varieties of vine in 1834 and planted the same in Victoria, near Melbourne and in South Australia.
The revolution in quality terms has been immense. Australia can now boast of world's most talented and knowledgeable wine makers.
Australia's best wines are named after the grape they are made from, known as varietal wines.
Many of wines are known by generic names like Hock, Claret, Burgundy etc.
1.    Dry white - Chardonnay, Rhine Riesling, Muscat, Chenin blanc, Semi lion, Gewurztraminer, Sauvignon blanc.
2.    Sweet White- Muscat, Riesling
3.    Red - Cabernet Sauvignon, PinotNoir, Merlot, Shiraz,…

USA wines

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American wine has been produced for over 300 years. Today, wine production is undertaken in all fifty states, with California producing 89 percent of all US wine. The United States is the fourth largest wine producing country in the world after France, Italy, and Spain. The North American continent is home to several native species of grape, including Vitis labrusca, Vitis riparia, Vitis rotundifolia, Vitis vulpina, and Vitis amurensis, but it was the introduction of the European Vitis vinifera by European settlers that led to the growth of the wine making industry. With more than 1,100,000 acres (4,500 km2) under vine, the United States is the sixth most planted country in the world after France, Italy, Spain, China and Turkey. North America's history of wine making dates back to 1521, when invading Spaniards planted the first vines. Wines have been produced in California since late 18th century. In California the grape vines were first planted by Spanish missionaries in San Diego.…